Wednesday

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Track ABCDE - A: Leadership
Leader(s): Maria Gallegos, Texas Brine Company
Co-Leader(s): Angie Shaw, LAPCO
7:00 to 8:00 Registration and Breakfast
Keynote Speaker: Ron Curry, EPA Region VI
8:00 to 8:50 Lessons from the Guru - Edu »
Speaker(s): Edu Araujo, Orion Engineered Carbons
TBA
8:50 to 9:10 Break
9:10 to 10:00 LOL - Leadership OUT LOUD! »
Speaker(s): Mark A. Hernandez, CHST, Multiply Leadership
TBA
10:00 to 11:30 Break - Trade Show
11:30 to 1:00 Lunch
Keynote Speaker: TBA TBA TBA TBA
1:00 to 1:50 Exceeding Expectations - Your Break from Average »
Speaker(s): Denis Baker, CSP, Flogistix
How do you eliminate competition? By Exceeding Expectations! How do you exceed expectations? Great question! In our time together, I will provide you with 10 practical and informative ways to exceed expectations all the time, every time. By exceeding expectations, you will break away from average. Average is boring!! Don’t be boring
1:50 to 2:10 Break
2:10 to 3:00 Open »
3:20 to 4:10 Open »
Speaker(s): Roy Massengale, EnRUD Resources, Inc
Track ABCDE - B: Air Updates
Leader(s): Carey Pugh, Lubrizol
Co-Leader(s): Leslie Ray, Westlake Chemical
7:00 to 8:00 Registration and Breakfast
Keynote Speaker: Ron Curry, EPA Region VI
8:00 to 8:50 Ozone Update »
Speaker(s): Matthew Kuryla, Baker Botts, Zachary L. Craft, Baker Botts
EPA revised the ozone standard to be more stringent on October 1, 2015. This presentation will give an overview of how the new standard will be implemented in designating nonattainment areas and planning to reach attainment. We will also address permitting issues and remaining regulatory obligations associated with the past ozone standards.
8:50 to 9:10 Break
9:10 to 10:00 The Complexities of NSR Permitting – A Case Study »
Speaker(s): Dan Dix, ALL4
This presentation will outline a case study involving the complexities involved with a New Source Review (NSR) construction permit application for a project that involved both Non-Attainment New Source Review (NNSR) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permitting. The presentation will focus on creative solutions for demonstration compliance with the 1-hour nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and annual fine particulate (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) through air dispersion modeling and obtaining Emission Reduction Credits (ERCs) as a part of NNSR for the precursors of ozone, NOX and VOC which is required projects was in the Ozone Transport Region (OTR) which treats ozone as a non-attainment pollutant.
10:00 to 11:30 Break - Trade Show
11:30 to 1:00 Lunch
Keynote Speaker: TBA TBA TBA TBA
1:00 to 1:50 Flares: Efficiency and Enforcement »
Speaker(s): Inaas Darrat, Trinity Consultants
In August 2012, U.S. EPA announced that Flaring Efficiency was going to be targeted as part of an enforcement initiative. As part of this initiative, US EPA has multiple additional parameters utilized for flare compliance in addition to the requirements contained in 40 CFR 60.18 and 40 CFR 63.11 and has required additional monitoring and other requirements as contained in Consent Decrees and 40 CFR 60, Subpart Ja. While NSPS Ja requirements only apply to petroleum refineries, those requirements do have an effect on the chemical industry. This presentation will cover those parameters, provide examples, cover requirements in Consent Decrees, and NSPS Ja requirements.
1:50 to 2:10 Break
2:10 to 3:00 Flaring Enforcement into Next Generation Flare Rule Making: Flare Management Plans and Beyond »
Speaker(s): Brandon Bass, Environmental Resources Management, Linda Bartlett, Environmental Resources Management
Flaring regulations are catching up with CDs and the EPA initiative to cut HAPs and are extending into other industries beyond refining. Non-refinery operations can learn from the refinery journey, including flare management plans (FMP). Actions taken now can position industries to prepare for coming capital and operating needs.
3:20 to 4:10 Fenceline Monitoring »
Speaker(s): Roy Massengale, EnRUD Resources, Inc
The Petroleum Refinery Sector Risk and Technology Review (RTR) NSPS final rule was published in the Federal Register on December 1, 2015. Along with some additional emission control requirements, the final rule requires a Fenceline Monitoring Program for Benzene using passive samplers. This presentation summarizes fenceline monitoring requirements and work practice standards in the final rule and discusses EPA Methods 325A and 325B. It also covers the theory behind passive sampling (Ficks' Law) and analysis. This presentation discusses monitoring programs setup from industry, consultant, and laboratory perspectives. It points out considerations for setting up passive fenceline monitoring programs at industrial sites and identifies some potential pitfalls associated with program setup and operation.
Speaker(s): Mark Galley, ThinkReliability
Track ABCDE - C: Best Practices
Leader(s): Phil Warren, Olin Blue Cube Operations
Co-Leader(s): Michael Jordan, Lubrizol
7:00 to 8:00 Registration and Breakfast
Keynote Speaker: Ron Curry, EPA Region VI
8:00 to 8:50 Safety Leadership Skills »
Speaker(s): C.J. Beysselance, HazTek Safety Management
This course is designed to educate anyone who supervises or directs others, to be a more effective leader. Special emphasis is placed on safety leadership however, topics included in this class also improve morale, productivity, quality and other elements of worker performance. Established concepts of workplace safety are explained in a manner that non-safety personnel can understand them and implement them. Proven industrial safety best-practices are discussed. The overall objective of the course is to deliver workplace safety theory in a practical and easy to understand manner, so that students can immediately implement these new skills as soon as they return to their workplace.
8:50 to 9:10 Break
9:10 to 10:00 The Migration to Mobile: The Evolution of EHS Software Tools »
Speaker(s): Milan Dayalal, Dakota Software
Mobile technology represents the next major advancement in ehs management, but many questions remain as to how, where, and when mobile devices can best be utilized. This session will cover the greatest opportunities for integrating mobile devices into EHS compliance and environmental management programs including auditing, incident reporting, and geo-tagged task management.
10:00 to 11:30 Break - Trade Show
11:30 to 1:00 Lunch
Keynote Speaker: TBA TBA TBA TBA
1:00 to 1:50 Personal Safety Takes a Team »
Speaker(s): Eddie Rivier, The Dow Chemical Company
1:50 to 2:10 Break
2:10 to 3:00 The iSystem: Designed for Injury Reduction When Performing Work »
Speaker(s): Gene Roberts, The Dow Chemical Company
Need a complete system to help your team work safe? These tools are designed to work together and improve safety performance... iCHAT - The Craft Hazard Assessment Tool is used to identify specific hazards associated with work. iPlan/iProcedure - Provide a safe work plan. iCard - Pre-task hazard assessment. iCan Stop work authority/iIntervene - Stop an unsafe act and the expectation to intervene.
3:20 to 4:10 To Err is Human, To Prevent is Process »
Speaker(s): Mark Galley, ThinkReliability
Preventing problems is more about clearly defined tasks than fixing people. People are of paramount importance which is why the focus should be on tasks. Highly reliable organizations don’t have perfect people; they have highly reliable work processes. This presentation demonstrates how a bias for process improves people’s performance.
Track ABCDE - D: PSM
Leader(s): Travis Guthrie, INVISTA
Co-Leader(s): Robert J. Weber, PSRG
7:00 to 8:00 Registration and Breakfast
Keynote Speaker: Ron Curry, EPA Region VI
8:00 to 8:50 Culture: Process versus Personal Safety »
Speaker(s): Juan Contreras, Williams
This presentation will focus on differentiating process safety from personal safety and how failure to do so has resulted in some of the largest incidents in industry history. It will also demonstrate that PSM compliance does not imply a positive process safety culture.
8:50 to 9:10 Break
9:10 to 10:00 Management of Organizational Change »
Speaker(s): Albert Ness, Center of Chemical Process Safety
Business demands, lean manufacturing, acquisitions, mergers, all tend to lead to reduced staffing and/or a change in job structures. The resulting changes can lead to reduced process safety if not handled properly. The need for Management of Change (MOC) systems is now widely recognized, however, the need for Management of Organizational Change (MOOC) does not always have the same level of recognition. Examples of incidents in which lack of MOOC played a role will be presented. Some key concerns related to (MOOC) will be also presented along with a process for managing these changes. The concept of a process safety competency matrix will also be introduced.
10:00 to 11:30 Break - Trade Show
11:30 to 1:00 Lunch
Keynote Speaker: TBA TBA TBA TBA
1:00 to 1:50 Top 10 Lessons Learned from MOC Implementations »
Speaker(s): Rainer Hoff
From time-to-time, various events—audit failures, discontent with the effort required for PSM compliance—triggered the reconsideration of various PSM elements. This often led to redesign and re implementation of parts of the PSM program.There is a specific focus on the following issues: “what’s a change?”, “who should create an MOC?”, effective communication of the program, evolutionary approaches vs “big bang” implementations, desire for and barriers to consistency across multiple sites, checklists: what level of detail is “right”?, integrating foreign sites with different regulatory requirements, small sites with minimal requirements, and others.
1:50 to 2:10 Break
2:10 to 3:00 Walk the Line »
Speaker(s): Jerry Forest, Celanese
In 2015, the focused improvement subgroup of the AFPM advancing process safety group targeted deep dive data analysis that shows a significant number of process safety incidents are caused by operator line-up errors. The program Walk the Line, addresses these causes with a 4 point strategy: reinforce culture, operational discipline, operational readiness, and interaction with the other areas of APS. Walk the Line discusses how to effectively implement a program that is designed to eliminate operator line-up errors in our industry
3:20 to 4:10 Open »
Speaker(s): Tom Harvey, Optimize Performance
Track ABCDE - E: Human Factors
Leader(s): Steve Ferrer, ProSys
Co-Leader(s): Shawn Smith, Kuraray America
7:00 to 8:00 Registration and Breakfast
Keynote Speaker: Ron Curry, EPA Region VI
8:00 to 8:50 Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents »
Speaker(s): Ian Nimmo, User Centered Design Services
In control rooms around the world the safety of field operators and adjoining neighborhoods is ultimately left to the control room operator who supervises the automation systems and ensures the process plant is returned to a safe state in the event of an abnormal or emergency operation. The goal of this operator is to ensure safe operations. Many dismiss the importance of this role and are over-confident of their electronic emergency shutdown systems. However, as we have witnessed from numerous incidents, sometimes that confidence is not well founded. Many incidents are not caused by a failure within a well thought through scenario that occurs. It is during the not so well thought out scenarios that incidents occur and a chain reaction, or domino effect is then caused by small holes in the defenses that align with them and allow the hazard to escape. As we have seen from previous incidents and Near Miss (Hit) Events, plants with well-designed trip systems have exploded causing injury and loss of life. In the Near Hit scenarios, we have witnessed the appropriate intervention of the control room operator who has prevented these type of events. However, why is that trip system intervention required if we employ operators for these very events? We have two words that answer that question, and they are found in numerous situations outside of industry from the Medical field, Aviation, Defense Systems and many others such as car accidents. Those two words are “Human Error”. So we should look at the common failures that lead to human error!
8:50 to 9:10 Break
9:10 to 10:00 There Will be Blood: API 770 and Human Error Prevention in Process Safety »
Speaker(s): Dave Hollaway, ABS Group
It is axiomatic that human error is a causal factor in 60 to 80 percent of accidents and catastrophic events in complex, tightly-coupled systems used in the process industry. It is also clear that these events often have large environmental and public consequences. This paper discusses the perception of consequences in mishap causation and presents a number of tools used to prevent human error. One of these is the SHEL Model, a simple but extremely effective way to analyze error provocative conditions through the interaction of system components with the human operators; the model may also be used as a results-multiplier in the application of human error mitigation strategies presented in API 770. Use of the SHEL Model for routine error trapping tasks such as job safety analyses, permit-to-work systems, or management of change, may significantly reduce the potential for human error as well as decease near miss and accident events.
10:00 to 11:30 Break - Trade Show
11:30 to 1:00 Lunch
Keynote Speaker: TBA TBA TBA TBA
1:00 to 1:50 Incorporating Human Factors into Health and Safety Audit Programs »
Speaker(s): John Angelo, TRC
Companies are revising their health and safety auditing and incident investigation programs to include Human Factors to further advance injury prevention. By incorporating Human Factors into an audit program, the audit fully examines the task, the worker, and company culture to develop a clearer picture on why employees perform errors that lead to workplace injuries. By incorporating Human Factors into the incident investigation process, trends and patters emerge to help the H&S Manager develop and implement effective injury prevention programs. Human Factors refer to job and environmental factors, organizational factors, and individual characteristics which influence behavior at work in a way which can affect employee health and safety. This presentation will focus on a case study where Human Factors was successfully implemented into a corporate health and safety audit program to focus on why errors were occurring and how to better prevent injuries.
1:50 to 2:10 Break
2:10 to 3:00 Job Role Impact on Safety »
Speaker(s): Dustin Beebe, ProSys
This presentation will review the aspects of decision making that have a big impact on safety in industrial processes. Specifically we will look at key roles such as the control system operator and process engineer. We will cover specific areas such as ability, training, mental and emotional state, physical state, and information sources. We will discuss determining immediacy of the consequence and safe guards that can be deployed to prevent injury to personnel. We will contrast the various roles and how to assess gaps that need to be covered. With the turnover of personnel and loss of experienced personnel, it is critical to assess job functions and provide the appropriate safe guards to insure safe and reliable process operations.
3:20 to 4:10 Human Performance Grows Behavior-Based Safety »
Speaker(s): Tom Harvey, Optimize Performance
Behavior-Based Safety is a good foundation, but organizations must build and grow. Don’t stay stuck – learn how to advance. Learn how high-reliability organizations successfully use Human Performance to identify and fix normalized deviation, process failure modes, reduce errors, and build up safety in ways that instill trust and foster learning.